Ditch Flowers and Dog-violets and Lesser Celandines, Oh My!: Acts of Cross-Class Kindness in Gaskell’s North and South

By Lauren Callihan (MA '19), Department of English, Kansas State University Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South (1855) chronicles the trials and tribulations of the novel’s protagonist Margaret Hale. After her father leaves the church, Margaret is uprooted from her charming home in rural Southern England and moves with her family to a smoky industrial town in … Continue reading Ditch Flowers and Dog-violets and Lesser Celandines, Oh My!: Acts of Cross-Class Kindness in Gaskell’s North and South

Fraudulent Fruit in “Goblin Market”

By Cailin Roles (MA '19), Department of English, Kansas State University Christina Rossetti’s 1862 poem “Goblin Market” tells the story of Laura and Lizzie, two young unmarried sisters who are tempted day and night by the cries of goblin fruit merchants. When Laura succumbs to temptation and trades a lock of her hair for a … Continue reading Fraudulent Fruit in “Goblin Market”

Analyzing Helen ‘Graham’: A Consideration of Female Independence

By Anna Meyer (MA '19), Department of English, Kansas State University WHO’S THAT GIRL? When Anne Brontë’s elusive female protagonist Helen Graham moves to Wildfell Hall, she’s the talk of town. How is it that a single woman and her child have come to rent this enormous mansion? What is her ethnic background? Why did … Continue reading Analyzing Helen ‘Graham’: A Consideration of Female Independence

ENGL825: Economic Women

Welcome to ENGL825: Economic Women, the blog site that will accompany the Spring 2019 graduate-level seminar course in the Department of English at Kansas State University.  In this course, we’ll think broadly about women’s relationship to Victorian economics, industrialism, and consumer culture by reading a selection of highly influential mid-nineteenth-century novels and poems including Christina … Continue reading ENGL825: Economic Women